Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

Volume 19, Number 8—August 2013

Research

Duration of Immunity to Norovirus Gastroenteritis

Kirsten Simmons, Manoj Gambhir, Juan Leon, and Ben LopmanComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA (K. Simmons, J. Leon, B. Lopman); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta (K. Simmons, B. Lopman); Imperial College London, London, UK (M. Gambhir)

Main Article

Table 2

Fixed input parameters for each model scenario for duration of immunity to norovirus gastroenteritis*

A B C D E F
Life expectancy, y NA 76 76 76 76 76 76 CDC FastStats (24)
Duration of incubation, d μs 1 1 1 1 1 1 Atmar et al., 2008 (20)
Duration of symptoms, d μa 2 2 2 2 2 2 Atmar et al., 2008 (20)
Duration of asymptomatic infection, d ρ 10 10 10 10 10 10 Rockx et al., 2002 (25)
Relative infectiousness during incubation period NA 0 0.05 0.25 0 0 0 Sukhrie et al., 2010 (26)
Relative infectiousness during asymptomatic infection period NA 0 0.05 0.25 0 0 0 Sukhrie et al., 2010 (26)
Proportion of population genetically resistant τ 0 0 0 0.2 0 0 Lindesmith et al., 2003 (18)
Strains included All All All All GII.4 only All Rosenthal et al., 2011 (27)
Boosting of immunity by asymptomatic infection? NA Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No

*NA, not applicable; CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Model A, only symptomatic infectiousness; model B, presyymptomatic and postsymptomatic infectiousness (low); model C, presymptomatic and postsymptomatic infectiousness (high); model D, innate genetic resistance; model E, genogroup 2 type 4 (GII.4); model F, no immune boosting by asymptomatic infection.

Main Article

TOP