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Volume 19, Number 9—September 2013

Research

Continued Evolution of West Nile Virus, Houston, Texas, USA, 2002–2012

Brian R. Mann1, Allison R. McMullen1, Daniele M. Swetnam, Vence Salvato, Martin Reyna, Hilda Guzman, Rudy Bueno, James A. Dennett, Robert B. Tesh, and Alan D.T. BarrettComments to Author 
Author affiliations: University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas, USA (B.R. Mann, A.R. McMullen, D.M. Swetnam, H. Guzman, R.B. Tesh, A.D.T. Barrett); Harris County Public Health and Environmental Services, Houston, Texas, USA (V. Salvato, M. Reyna, R. Bueno, Jr., J.A. Dennett)

Main Article

Figure 4

Phylogenetic support for expanded application of the proposed Harris County, Texas, USA, paradigm as a model for West Nile virus (WNV) evolution during the Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas, outbreak, 2012. Bayesian coalescent tree depicts shared monophyletic lineage of the novel Collin County WNV isolates in group 9 (TX AR12-1648) and group 10 (TX AR12-10674) with the TX AR12-1486 Denton County, Texas, isolate clustering with the TX8572 2012 Harris County isolate. Red indicates novel Collin County and D

Figure 4. . Phylogenetic support for expanded application of the proposed Harris County, Texas, USA, paradigm as a model for West Nile virus (WNV) evolution during the Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas, outbreak, 2012. Bayesian coalescent tree depicts shared monophyletic lineage of the novel Collin County WNV isolates in group 9 (TX AR12-1648) and group 10 (TX AR12-10674) with the TX AR12-1486 Denton County, Texas, isolate clustering with the TX8572 2012 Harris County isolate. Red indicates novel Collin County and Denton County isolates sequenced in this study. Posterior probabilities ≥0.90 are indicated along the branches to provide statistical support for inferred topologies. Scale bar indicates divergence time in years.

Main Article

1These authors contributed equally to this article.

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