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Volume 19, Number 9—September 2013

Synopsis

Nodding Syndrome

Scott F. DowellComments to Author , James J. Sejvar, Lul Riek, Katelijn A.H. Vandemaele, Margaret Lamunu, Annette C. Kuesel, Erich Schmutzhard, William Matuja, Sudhir Bunga, Jennifer Foltz, Thomas B. Nutman, Andrea S. Winkler, and Anthony K. Mbonye
Author affiliations: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA (S.F. Dowell, J.J. Sejvar, S. Bunga, J. Foltz); Ministry of Health, Juba, South Sudan (L. Riek); World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland (K.A.H. Vandemaele, M. Lamunu, A.C. Kuesel); University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria (E. Schmutzhard); Muhimbili University, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania (W. Matuja); National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA (T.B. Nutman); Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany (A.S. Winkler); Ministry of Health, Kampala, Uganda (A.K. Mbonye); Makerere University, Kampala (A.K. Mbonye)

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Figure 3

Countries in the former Onchocerciasis Control Programme in western Africa in which onchocerciasis was eliminated as a public health problem through vector control (green); countries in the African Programme for Onchocerciasis Control in which onchocerciasis control is ongoing through annual mass treatment with ivermectin (beige); and areas in Southern Sudan, northern Uganda, and southern Tanzania in which nodding syndrome has been reported (red circles).

Figure 3. . . Countries in the former Onchocerciasis Control Programme in western Africa in which onchocerciasis was eliminated as a public health problem through vector control (green); countries in the African Programme for Onchocerciasis Control in which onchocerciasis control is ongoing through annual mass treatment with ivermectin (beige); and areas in Southern Sudan, northern Uganda, and southern Tanzania in which nodding syndrome has been reported (red circles).

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