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Volume 19, Number 9—September 2013

Synopsis

Nodding Syndrome

Scott F. DowellComments to Author , James J. Sejvar, Lul Riek, Katelijn A.H. Vandemaele, Margaret Lamunu, Annette C. Kuesel, Erich Schmutzhard, William Matuja, Sudhir Bunga, Jennifer Foltz, Thomas B. Nutman, Andrea S. Winkler, and Anthony K. Mbonye
Author affiliations: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA (S.F. Dowell, J.J. Sejvar, S. Bunga, J. Foltz); Ministry of Health, Juba, South Sudan (L. Riek); World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland (K.A.H. Vandemaele, M. Lamunu, A.C. Kuesel); University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria (E. Schmutzhard); Muhimbili University, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania (W. Matuja); National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA (T.B. Nutman); Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany (A.S. Winkler); Ministry of Health, Kampala, Uganda (A.K. Mbonye); Makerere University, Kampala (A.K. Mbonye)

Main Article

Figure 5

Ictal electroencephalographic recording of a 12-year-old boy in Uganda with nodding syndrome obtained during a typical nodding episode. Shown is a sudden electrodecremental episode with concomitant electromyographic decrease in neck muscles, followed by sharply contoured theta activity.

Figure 5. . . Ictal electroencephalographic recording of a 12-year-old boy in Uganda with nodding syndrome obtained during a typical nodding episode. Shown is a sudden electrodecremental episode with concomitant electromyographic decrease in neck muscles, followed by sharply contoured theta activity.

Main Article

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