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Volume 20, Number 5—May 2014

CME ACTIVITY

Outbreaks of Kingella kingae Infections in Daycare Facilities

Pablo YagupskyComments to Author 
Author affiliation: Soroka University Medical Center, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel

Main Article

Table 1

Demographic and clinical features of 6 clusters of invasive Kingella kingae infections in daycare centers in the United States, Israel, and France*

Reference Year Country Attack rate (%) No. cases confirmed by
No. presump. cases Patient age range, mo Outbreak duration, d Clinical syndromes
Culture NAAA SA OM SD CE OB EN MN
(38) 2003 United States 3/21 (14.3) 2 ND 1 17–21 <14 2† 2†
(39) 2005 Israel 3/14 (21.4) 1 ND 2 8–12 15 3
(37) 2007 United States 3/14 (21.4) 2 ND 1 11–25 11 1 1 1‡ 1‡
(35) 2011 France 5/24 (20.8) 0 1 4 10–16 30 1 4
P. Yagupsky, unpub. data 2012 Israel 2/36 (5.6) 1 ND 1 10–16 7 1 1
P. Yagupsky, unpub. data
2013
Israel
2/13
(15.4)
2
ND
0
12
7
2






Total 18/122
(14.8) 8 1 9 8–25 7–30 6 9 1 1 1 1 1

*NAAA, nucleic acid amplification assay; presump., presumptive; SA, septic arthritis; OM, osteomyelitis; SD, spondylodiscitis; CE, cellulitis; OB, occult bacteremia; EN, endocarditis; MN, meningitis.; ND, not done; – indicates that no patients manifested this syndrome.
†One child had osteomyelitis of the femur and septic arthritis of the contiguous hip joint.
‡Meningitis developed in 1 child who had endocarditis.

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