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Volume 20, Number 6—June 2014

Dispatch

Timeliness of Yellow Fever Surveillance, Central African Republic

Antoine Rachas1, Emmanuel Nakouné, Julie Bouscaillou, Juliette Paireau, Benjamin Selekon, Dominique Senekian, Arnaud Fontanet, and Mirdad KazanjiComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Institut Pasteur, Bangui, Central African Republic (A. Rachas, E. Nakouné, J. Bouscaillou, B. Selekon, M. Kazanji); Institut Pasteur, Paris, France (A. Rachas, J. Bouscaillou, J. Paireau, A, Fontanet); Ministry of Health, Bangui, (D. Senekian); Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers, Paris (A. Fontanet)

Main Article

Figure 1

Temporal pattern of mean time (delay between date of onset of jaundice reported by the patient and date of an ELISA result) for A) yellow fever surveillance, B)  blood sample collection, C) field storage of samples, D) transportation of samples, and E)  testing of samples, Central African Republic, 2007–2012. Shaded areas indicate 95% CIs.

Figure 1. Temporal pattern of mean time (delay between date of onset of jaundice reported by the patient and date of an ELISA result) for A) yellow fever surveillance, B) blood sample collection, C) field storage of samples, D) transportation of samples, and E) testing of samples, Central African Republic, 2007–2012Shaded areas indicate 95% CIs.

Main Article

1Current affiliation: European Hospital Georges Pompidou and Descartes University, Paris, France.

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