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Volume 20, Number 6—June 2014

Research

Rapid Spread and Diversification of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Genotype ON1, Kenya

Charles N. AgotiComments to Author , James R. Otieno, Caroline W. Gitahi, Patricia A. Cane, and D. James Nokes
Author affiliations: Kenya Medical Research Institute–Wellcome Trust Research Programme, Kilifi, Kenya (C.N. Agoti, J.R. Otieno, C.W. Gitahi, D.J. Nokes); Public Health England, London, UK (P.A. Cane); University of Warwick and WIDER, Coventry, UK (D.J. Nokes)

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Table 1

Occurrence of RSV group A and B viruses and of genotype ON1 in Kilifi, Kenya, 2012*

Month No. RSV strains detected
RSV group A sequencing result
Group A Group B Co-infected (A+B) Total No. (%) ON1 strains† Non-ON1 Not sequenced
First wave
Jan 0 18 0 18 0 0 0
Feb 6 23 0 29 1 (20.0) 4 1
Mar 15 26 1 42 8 (53.3) 7 1
Apr 14 16 1 31 5 (41.7) 7 3
May 4 6 0 10 3 (100.0) 0 1
Jun 11 2 0 13 9 (81.8) 2 0
Jul 3 0 0 3 3 (100.0) 0 0
Aug
2
0
0
2

2 (100.0)
0
0
Non-wave period
Sep
0
1
0
1

0
0
0
Second wave
Oct 7 1 0 8 4 (66.7) 2 1
Nov 38 16 1 55 31 (91.2) 3 5
Dec‡
23
5
0
28

11 (84.6)
2
10
Total 123 114 3 240 77 (74.0) 27 21

*The calendar year 2012 spans parts of 2 epidemics: the 2011–12 epidemic, which occurred during October 2011–August 2012 (peak March 2012), and the 2012–13 epidemic, which occurred during October 2012–July 2013 (peak November 2012). Group B RSVs predominated during the 2011–12 epidemic (65.0%), and group A RSVs predominated during the 2012–13 epidemic (79.28%). RSV, respiratory syncytial virus.
†Percentages represent the proportion of ON1 viruses among RSV A sequenced samples from each month.
‡Because of local logistics problems, samples were not collected from all the subjects that were eligible in December.

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