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Volume 3, Number 2—June 1997

Dispatch

A New Tick-borne Encephalitis-like Virus Infecting New England Deer Ticks, Ixodes dammini1

Sam R. Telford*, Philip M. Armstrong*, Paula Katavolos*, Ivo Foppa*, A. Sonia Olmeda Garcia*†, Mark L. Wilson‡, and Andrew Spielman*
Author affiliations: *Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; †Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Spain; and ‡Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA

Main Article

Figure 1

Comparison of morphology and tinctorial properties of Feulgen stained, intact tick salivary glands infected by three of the deer tick pathogen guild. Spirochetes only transiently migrate through salivary tissues, and thus would not be visualized by this technique. (A) Ehrlichia microti. Polyhedral clusters of rickettsiae (arrows) within hypertrophied salivary acinus. (B) Babesia microti, dense stippling of sporoblasts (arrows). Each minute dot represents the nucleus of a sporozoite. (C) Deer tic

Figure 1. Comparison of morphology and tinctorial properties of Feulgen stained, intact tick salivary glands infected by three of the deer tick pathogen guild. Spirochetes only transiently migrate through salivary tissues, and thus would not be visualized by this technique. (A) Ehrlichia microti. Polyhedral clusters of rickettsiae (arrows) within hypertrophied salivary acinus. (B) Babesia microti, dense stippling of sporoblasts (arrows). Each minute dot represents the nucleus of a sporozoite. (C) Deer tick virus. Hypotrophied salivary acinus filled with amorphous masses of pinkstaining (=Feulgen positive) material (arrows). Scale bar = 10 µm.

Main Article

1The taxonomy continues to be controversial (5).

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