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Volume 3, Number 3—September 1997

Perspective

Host Genes and HIV: The Role of the Chemokine Receptor Gene CCR5 and Its Allele (∆32 CCR5)

Janet M. McNichollComments to Author , Dawn K. Smith, Shoukat H. Qari, and Thomas Hodge
Author affiliations: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Main Article

Figure 4

Partial CCR5 gene and amino acid sequence with 32 bp deletion. Nucleotide sequence of the CCR5 gene surrounding the deleted region, and translation into the normal receptor (top lines) or the truncated mutant (∆32 CCR5, bottom lines). The 10-bp direct repeat is represented in bold italics and the deleted nucleotides are represented in noncapitalized font.

Figure 4. Partial CCR5 gene and amino acid sequence with 32 bp deletion. Nucleotide sequence of the CCR5 gene surrounding the deleted region, and translation into the normal receptor (top lines) or the truncated mutant (∆32 CCR5, bottom lines). The 10-bp direct repeat is represented in bold italics and the deleted nucleotides are represented in noncapitalized font.

Main Article

1Garred P, Eugen-Olsen J, Iversen AKN, Benfield TL, Svejgaard A, Hofmann, B, the Copenhagen AIDS Study Group. Dual effect of CCR5 D32 gene deletion in HIV-1-infected patients. Lancet 1997; 349:1884.

2Martinson JJ, Chapman NH, Rees DC, Lui Y-T, Clegg JB. Global distribution of the CCR5 gene 32-basepair deletion [letter]. Nature Genetics 1997;16:100-103.

3Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Facts about CCR5 and protection against HIV-1 infection; 1997.

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