Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to site content
CDC Home

Volume 3, Number 3—September 1997

Synopsis

Aedes albopictus in the United States: Ten-Year Presence and Public Health Implications

Chester G. MooreComments to Author  and Carl J. Mitchell
Author affiliations: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA

Main Article

Table 1

Susceptibility of Aedes albopictus to oral infection with arboviruses and
ability to transmit by bite*

Ae. albopictus strains from
Hawaii and areas
outside W. Hemisphere
North and South America
Viruses Infect. Trans. Infect. Trans.
Chikungunya + + + +
Dengue 1, 2, 3, 4 + + + +
Eastern equine encephalitis + + + +
Jamestown Canyon + +
Japanese encephalitis + +
Keystone + -
La Crosse + +
Mayaro + +
Nodamura + ?
Oropouche + -
Orungo + +
Potosi + +
Rift Valley fever + +
Ross River + + + +
San Angelo + +
Sindbis + +
St. Louis encephalitis + +
Trivittatus + -
West Nile + +
Western equine encephalitis + + + +
Venezuelan equine encephalitis + +
Yellow fever + + + +

* Modified from Mitchell (1991) (10)

Main Article

Top of Page

USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention   1600 Clifton Rd. Atlanta, GA 30333, USA
800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) TTY: (888) 232-6348 - Contact CDC–INFO