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Volume 4, Number 2—June 1998

Perspective

Wild Primate Populations in Emerging Infectious Disease Research: The Missing Link?

Nathan D. Wolfe*, Ananias A. Escalante†, William B. Karesh‡, Annelisa Kilbourn‡, Andrew Spielman*, and Altaf A. Lal†
Author affiliations: *Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; †Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Public Health Service, Chamblee, Georgia, USA; ‡Wildlife Health Sciences, Wildlife Conservation Society, Bronx, New York, USA.

Main Article

Figure 1

Relationships among primate and human lentiviruses: Phylogeny of primate lentiviruses based on the gag gene obtained by (25). The names of the strains are indicated in parentheses. Hosts are indicated on trees. The description of the lentivirus strains is provided in (25).

Figure 1. Relationships among primate and human lentiviruses: Phylogeny of primate lentiviruses based on the gag gene obtained by (25). The names of the strains are indicated in parentheses. Hosts are indicated on trees. The description of the lentivirus strains is provided in (25).

Main Article

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