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Volume 5, Number 1—February 1999

Synopsis

Comparative Genomics and Host Resistance against Infectious Diseases

Salman T. Qureshi*†, Emil Skamene*†, and Danielle Malo*†
Author affiliations: *McGill University, Montréal, Canada; †Montréal General Hospital, Montréal,Canada

Main Article

Figure

Schematic representation of microsatellite marker analysis in mice. A) Flanking forward (F) and reverse (R) oligonucleotides are designed to specifically amplify a simple sequence repeat by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (in this case a CA dinucleotide). The length of the dinucleotide (N) varies among inbred mouse strains. B) Gel electrophoresis of a PCR-amplified microsatellite in homozygous parental strains A and B and heterozygous F1 progeny. The larger microsatellite from strain A migrates

Figure. Schematic representation of microsatellite marker analysis in mice. A) Flanking forward (F) and reverse (R) oligonucleotides are designed to specifically amplify a simple sequence repeat by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (in this case a CA dinucleotide). The length of the dinucleotide (N) varies among inbred mouse strains. B) Gel electrophoresis of a PCR-amplified microsatellite in homozygous parental strains A and B and heterozygous F1 progeny. The larger microsatellite from strain A migrates more slowly than that of strain B. Inheritance of both parental alleles is shown in the F1.

Main Article

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