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Volume 5, Number 3—June 1999

Dispatch

Risk for Rabies Transmission from Encounters with Bats, Colorado, 1977–1996

W. John Pape*Comments to Author , Thomas D. Fitzsimmons*†, and Richard E. Hoffman*
Author affiliations: *Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, Denver, Colorado, USA and †Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Main Article

Table 1

Prevalence of rabies in bats submitted for testing, Colorado, 1977–1996

Species No. that bit humans
(% rabid) No. that did not bite humans
(% rabid) Total no.tested
(% rabid)
Big brown bat 122 2,013 2,135
Eptesicus fuscus (27) (16) (17)
Myotis genus groupa 35 722 757
(14) (6) (7)
Silver-haired bat 28 628 656
Lasionycteris noctivagans (14) (5) (5)
Hoary bat 13 452 465
Lasiurus cinereus (77) (39) (40)
Long-eared bat 8 38 46
Myotis evotis (88) (21) (33)
Brazilian free-tailed bat 0 41 41
(0) (12) (12)
Tadarida brasiliensis
Red bat 1 25 26
Lasiurus borealis (100) (8) (12)
Pallid bat 0 21 21
Antrozous pallidus (0) (5) (5)
Big free-tailed bat 2 19 21
Nyctinomops macrotis (50) (11) (14)
Townsend's big- eared bat 1 13 14
(0) (0) (0)
Plecotus townsendii
Species data 23 265 288
unavailable (35) (9) (11)
Total 233 4,237 4,470
(30) (14) (15)

aIncludes six species in the genus Myotis that could not be easily distinguished by inspection: M. lucifugus, M. volans, M. thysanodes, M. californicus, M. ciliolabrum, des, M. californicus, M. ciliolabrum, and M. yumanesis.

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