Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

Volume 5, Number 5—October 1999

Research

Abscesses due to Mycobacterium abscessus Linked to Injection of Unapproved Alternative Medication

Karin Galil*Comments to Author , Lisa A. Miller†, Mitchell A. Yakrus*, Richard J. Wallace‡, David G. Mosley§, Bob England§, Gwen Huitt¶, Michael M. McNeil*, and Bradley A. Perkins*
Author affiliations: *Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; †Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, Denver, Colorado, USA; ‡University of Texas Health Center, Tyler, Texas, USA; §Arizona Department of Health Services, Phoenix, Arizona, USA; and ¶National Jewish Medical and Research Center, Denver, Colorado, USA

Main Article

Table

Persons who received presumed adrenal cortex extract (ACE*) and reported an abscess and persons who received ACE* but did not develop an abscess, United States, January 1, 1995, to August 18, 1996

Patient and treatment characteristics Persons with abscesses
(n = 87) Persons without abscesses
(n = 42)
Median age 45 years 46 years
(Range) (15-74) (20-77)
Sex
Female 81 (93%) 35 (83%)
Male 6 (7%) 7 (17%)
Median dose 1 cc 1 cc
(Range) (1-2 cc) (1-10 cc)
Dose frequency
Single 35 (40%) 11 (26%)
Monthly 25 (29%) 10 (24%)
Source of injection
Provider 77 (89%) 34 (81%)
Self/home 9 (10%) 8 (19%)
Both 1 (1%)
Primary route of administration
Intramuscular 86 (99%) 36 (86%)
Intravenous 1 (1%) 6 (14%)
Intramuscular site
Gluteal 82 (95%) 29 (69%)
Other 4 (5%) 13 (31%)
Indicationa
Weight loss 61 (70%) 23 (55%)
Fatigue 11 (13%) 9 (21%)
Hypoadrenalism 9 (10%) 10 (24%)
Other 13 (15%) 8 (19%)

aSome persons received ACE* for more than one indication.

Main Article

TOP