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Volume 5, Number 5—October 1999

Research

Abscesses due to Mycobacterium abscessus Linked to Injection of Unapproved Alternative Medication

Karin Galil*Comments to Author , Lisa A. Miller†, Mitchell A. Yakrus*, Richard J. Wallace‡, David G. Mosley§, Bob England§, Gwen Huitt¶, Michael M. McNeil*, and Bradley A. Perkins*
Author affiliations: *Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; †Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, Denver, Colorado, USA; ‡University of Texas Health Center, Tyler, Texas, USA; §Arizona Department of Health Services, Phoenix, Arizona, USA; and ¶National Jewish Medical and Research Center, Denver, Colorado, USA

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Table

Persons who received presumed adrenal cortex extract (ACE*) and reported an abscess and persons who received ACE* but did not develop an abscess, United States, January 1, 1995, to August 18, 1996

Patient and treatment characteristics Persons with abscesses
(n = 87) Persons without abscesses
(n = 42)
Median age 45 years 46 years
(Range) (15-74) (20-77)
Sex
Female 81 (93%) 35 (83%)
Male 6 (7%) 7 (17%)
Median dose 1 cc 1 cc
(Range) (1-2 cc) (1-10 cc)
Dose frequency
Single 35 (40%) 11 (26%)
Monthly 25 (29%) 10 (24%)
Source of injection
Provider 77 (89%) 34 (81%)
Self/home 9 (10%) 8 (19%)
Both 1 (1%)
Primary route of administration
Intramuscular 86 (99%) 36 (86%)
Intravenous 1 (1%) 6 (14%)
Intramuscular site
Gluteal 82 (95%) 29 (69%)
Other 4 (5%) 13 (31%)
Indicationa
Weight loss 61 (70%) 23 (55%)
Fatigue 11 (13%) 9 (21%)
Hypoadrenalism 9 (10%) 10 (24%)
Other 13 (15%) 8 (19%)

aSome persons received ACE* for more than one indication.

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