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Volume 6, Number 3—June 2000

Research

Using Remotely Sensed Data To Identify Areas at Risk for Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome

Gregory E. Glass*Comments to Author , James E. Cheek†, Jonathan A. Patz*, Timothy M. Shields*, Timothy J. Doyle‡, Douglas A. Thoroughman†, Darcy K. Hunt†, Russell E. Enscore§, Kenneth L. Gage§, Charles Irland†, C. J. Peters¶, and Ralph Bryan§
Author affiliations: *The Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA; †Indian Health Service, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA; ‡Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA; §Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Ft. Collins, Colorado, USA; and ¶Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

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Table 1

Spatial clustering of households with hantavirus pulmonary syndrome

k T[k] z P
1 6 0.91 0.181
2 14 1.88 0.030
3 24 3.05 0.001
4 33 3.71 <0.001
5 40 3.87 <0.001
6 50 4.57 <0.001
7 64 5.85 <0.001
8 75 6.50 <0.001
9 79 6.14 <0.001
10 86 6.21 <0.001

Cuzick and Edwards' test (13), T[k], its z score under the null hypothesis and the p value using Simes correction for multiple tests (16). Results show significant spatial clustering among case households for the second through tenth nearest neighbors (k= 2,...,10). elevation

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