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Volume 6, Number 3—June 2000

Research

Potential Human Exposure to Australian Bat Lyssavirus, Queensland, 1996-1999

Bradley J. McCall*Comments to Author , Jonathan H. Epstein*, Annette S. Neill*, Karen Heel*, Hume E. Field†, Janine Barrett‡, Greg A. Smith§, Linda A. Selvey¶, Barry Rodwell†, and Ross Lunt#
Author affiliations: *Brisbane Southside Public Health Unit, Cooper's Plains, Queensland, Australia; †Queensland Department of Primary Industries, Yerongpillly, Queensland, Australia; ‡The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Australia; §Queensland Health Scientific Services, Cooper's Plains, Queensland, Australia; ¶Queensland Health; and #CSIRO Australian Animal Health Laboratory, Geelong, Victoria, Australia

Main Article

Table

Groups at risk for exposure to Australian bat lyssavirus

Group at risk Number of potential exposures
(n = 203) Mean age and age range
(yrs) Gender
(M/F) Median interval between potential exposure and notification (d) Bite/nonbite injury
(n = 202) Provoked (%)
(n = 202)
Volunteer bat handlers 79 40.5 (16-83) 15/64 19 (0-2105) 56/23 79/79 (100)
Household or family member of volunteer bat handlers 24 17.5 (5-51) 12/12 27 (0-1809) 18/6 24/24 (100)
Professional animal worker 28 34 (17-69) 15/13 4 (0-1818) 13/14 27/27 (100)
Community-intentional potential exposure 63 39 (6-85) 40/23 10 (0-2907) 41/22 62/63 (98)
Community-unintential exposure 9 32 (16-49) 4/5 2 (0-32) 3/6 4/9 (44)

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