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Volume 6, Number 3—June 2000

Research

Rhinosporidium seeberi: A Human Pathogen from a Novel Group of Aquatic Protistan Parasites

David N. Fredricks*†Comments to Author , Jennifer A. Jolley*, Paul W. Lepp*, Jon C. Kosek†, and David A. Relman*†
Author affiliations: *Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA; and †Veterans Affairs, Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California, USA

Main Article

Figure 1

Histology of rhinosporidiosis. A formaldehyde-fixed section of human nasal polyp was stained with Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) and visualized by bright-field microscopy at 400X magnification. The thick walls of immature R. seeberi trophocytes stain with PAS (pink), and the spherical organisms are surrounded by inflammatory cells.

Figure 1. Histology of rhinosporidiosis. A formaldehyde-fixed section of human nasal polyp was stained with Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) and visualized by bright-field microscopy at 400X magnification. The thick walls of immature R. seeberi trophocytes stain with PAS (pink), and the spherical organisms are surrounded by inflammatory cells.

Main Article

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