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Volume 6, Number 4—August 2000

Research

Dual Captures of Colorado Rodents: Implications for Transmission of Hantaviruses

Charles H. Calisher*Comments to Author , James E. Childs†, William P. Sweeney*, K. Max Canestorp‡, and Barry J. Beaty*
Author affiliations: *Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA; ‡Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; ‡Colorado Fish and Wildlife Assistance Office, Denver, Colorado, USA

Main Article

Table 1

Rodents involved in dual captures from three Colorado study sites (two western, one eastern)

Speciesa
Site (trap nights) P. man S (D) P. truei S (D) R. meg. S (D) S. hisp. S (D) T. min. S (D) C. hisp. S (D) Pe. flav. S (D) Otherb S
Fort Lewis (10440) 505 (5) 6 (0) 0 (0) 0 (0) 71 (1) 0 (0) 0 (0) 2
Molina (9135) 566 (8) 217 (0) 2 (0) 0 (0) 132 (0) 0 (0) 0 (0) 12
Pinon Canyon (24375) 829 (10c) 561 (0) 562 (15) 259 (2) 1 (0) 23 (1) 195 (1) 520
Total 1900 (23) 784 (0) 564 (15) 259 (2) 204 (1) 23 (1) 195 (1) 534

aNumbers of single (S) and dual (D) captures are listed by species at each study site. P. man = Peromyscus maniculatus; P. truei = Peromyscus truei; R. meg. = Reithrodontomys megalotis; S. hisp. = Sigmodon hispidus; T. min. = Tamias minimus; C. hisp. = Chaetodipus hispidus; Pe. flav. = Perognathus flavus.
b 534 rodents from 12 other species; no dual captures.
cOne of these pairs was adult male deer mouse and an adult male pinyon mouse.

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