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Volume 6, Number 4—August 2000

Dispatch

Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis, a Measles Complication, in an Internationally Adopted Child

Daniel J. Bonthius*Comments to Author , Nicholas Stanek†, and Charles Grose*
Author affiliations: *Department of Pediatrics, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USA; †Department of Neurology, Medical Associates Clinic, Dubuque, Iowa, USA

Main Article

Figure 1

MRI scans of the brain at the time of presentation in the neurology clinic (A and B) and 3 months later (C and D). Panels A and C are T1-weighted images; B and D are T2-weighted images. The initial MRI scan (A and B) reveals a focal abnormality in the subcortical white matter of the left frontal lobe, consisting of a hypointense signal on the T1-weighted image (arrow in A) and a hyperintense signal on the T2-weighted image (arrow in B). In the followup scan, the focal abnormality in the left fro

Figure 1. MRI scans of the brain at the time of presentation in the neurology clinic (A and B) and 3 months later (C and D). Panels A and C are T1-weighted images; B and D are T2-weighted images. The initial MRI scan (A and B) reveals a focal abnormality in the subcortical white matter of the left frontal lobe, consisting of a hypointense signal on the T1-weighted image (arrow in A) and a hyperintense signal on the T2-weighted image (arrow in B). In the followup scan, the focal abnormality in the left frontal lobe is less obvious than previously (arrow in D), but advanced and diffuse cortical atrophy is present, signified by the ventriculomegaly and markedly enlarged sulci (arrowheads in C).

Main Article

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