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Volume 7, Number 1—February 2001

Research

Active Bacterial Core Surveillance of the Emerging Infections Program Network

Anne Schuchat*Comments to Author , Tami Hilger*, Elizabeth Zell*, Monica M. Farley†, Arthur Reingold‡, Lee Harrison§, Lewis Lefkowitz¶, Richard Danila**, Karen Stefonek††, Nancy Barrett‡‡, Dale Morse§§, Robert Pinner*, and for the Active Bacterial Core Surveillance Team of the Emerging Infections Program Network
Author affiliations: *Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; †Georgia Emerging Infection Program (Georgia Department of Human Resources, Division of Public Health, Emory University School of Medicine, and the Atlanta Veterans Administration Medical Center) Atlanta, Georgia, USA; ‡California Department of Health Services and UC Berkeley School of Public Health, Berkeley, California, USA; §Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene and Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA; ¶Tennessee Department of Health and Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA; **Minnesota Department of Health, St. Paul, Minnesota, USA; ††Oregon Department of Human Resources, Portland, Oregon, USA; ‡‡Connecticut Department of Public Health, Hartford, Connecticut, USA; §§New York State Department of Health, Albany, New York, USA

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Figure 2

Invasive group B streptococcal disease in infants less than 1 week of age per 1,000 live births and in adults >65 years of age per 100,000 population, Active Bacterial Core surveillance, 1993-1998 (adapted from ref. 22).

Figure 2. Invasive group B streptococcal disease in infants less than 1 week of age per 1,000 live births and in adults >65 years of age per 100,000 population, Active Bacterial Core surveillance, 1993-1998 (adapted from ref. 22).

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