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Volume 7, Number 3—June 2001

Research

Geographic Distribution and Genetic Diversity of Whitewater Arroyo Virus in the Southwestern United States

Charles F. Fulhorst*Comments to Author , Remi N. Charrel*†, Scott C. Weaver*, Thomas G. Ksiazek‡, Robert D. Bradley§, Mary L. Milazzo*, Robert B. Tesh*, and Michael D. Bowen‡
Author affiliations: *University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas, USA; †Faculté de Médecine, Marseille, France; ‡Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; §Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas, USA

Main Article

Figure 1

Locations of 14 arenavirus-positive Neotoma rodent collections. San Juan County, southeastern Utah = N. cinerea and N. mexicana (one virus-positive animal each species); Cimarron County, western Oklahoma = N. albigula (2); McKinley County, northwestern New Mexico = N. albigula (2); Socorro County, central New Mexico = N. mexicana (3); Dimmit and La Salle counties (Chaparral Wildlife Management Area), southern Texas = N. micropus (5). The map inset shows the location of study area.

Figure 1. . Locations of 14 arenavirus-positive Neotoma rodent collections. San Juan County, southeastern Utah = N. cinerea and N. mexicana (one virus-positive animal each species); Cimarron County, western Oklahoma = N. albigula (2); McKinley County, northwestern New Mexico = N. albigula (2); Socorro County, central New Mexico = N. mexicana (3); Dimmit and La Salle counties (Chaparral Wildlife Management Area), southern Texas = N. micropus (5). The map inset shows the location of study area.

Main Article

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