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Volume 7, Number 3—June 2001

Research

Is High Prevalence of Echinococcus multilocularis in Wild and Domestic Animals Associated with Disease Incidence in Humans?

Bruno Gottstein*Comments to Author , Francis Saucy†, Peter Deplazes‡, Juerg Reichen*, Georges Demierre§, Andre Busato*, Christian Zuercher*, and Paul Pugin¶
Author affiliations: *University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland; †University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland; ‡University of Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland; §Medecin Cantonal, Fribourg, Switzerland; ¶Centre de Transfusion Sanguin, Hôpital Cantonal, Fribourg, Switzerland

Main Article

Table 1

Prevalence of Echinococcus multilocularis in Arvicola terrestris and Microtus arvalis captured in spring 1993 and 1998

No. of A. terrestris No. positive by microscopy/immunochemistry No. of M. arvalis No. positive by microscopy/ immunohistochemistry
1993 28 11 (39) [21-57] nta - - -
1994 44 5 (11) [2-20] 20 2 (10) [3-23]
1995 67 6 (9) [2-16] 61 13 (21) [11-32]
1996 49 10 (20) [9-21] 55 9 (16) [7-26]
1997 59 4 (7) [1-13] 52 12 (23) [12-35]
1998
46
4
(9)
[1-17]
32
5
(16)
[3-28]
Totals 293 40 (14) [1-18] 220 41 (19) [13-24]

ant = not trapped.
bpositivity is based on a primary microscopy lesion detection and subsequent confirmation of E. multilocularis by immunohistochemistry and PCR.

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