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Volume 8, Number 11—November 2002
THEME ISSUE
Tuberculosis Genotyping

Tuberculosis Genotyping Network, United States

Mycobacterium tuberculosis Transmission between Cluster Members with Similar Fingerprint Patterns

Kashef Ijaz*, Zhenhua Yang†, H. Stewart Matthews‡, Joseph H. Bates‡§, and M. Donald Cave§¶Comments to Author 
Author affiliations: *Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; †University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA; ‡Arkansas Department of Health, Little Rock, Arkansas, USA; §University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas, USA; ¶Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare Services, Little Rock, Arkansas, USA

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Figure 1

Restriction fragment length polymorphism patterns of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from 11 patients residing in two geographically contiguous counties, Arkansas, 1992–1998. IS6110 patterns are shown on the left and polymorphic GC-rich sequence on the right. Lane M shows M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv DNA marker (left) and 1-kb DNA ladder (right). Lane 1, isolate from patient 11; Lane 2, patient 13; Lanes 3–6, patients 4, 1, 3, and 2; Lanes 7–9, patients 10, 9, and 8; Lane 10, patient whose isolate differed by three bands and was not included in the study; and Lane 11, patient 5.

Figure 1. Restriction fragment length polymorphism patterns of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from 11 patients residing in two geographically contiguous counties, Arkansas, 1992–1998. IS6110 patterns are shown on the left and polymorphic GC-rich sequence on the right. Lane M shows M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv DNA marker (left) and 1-kb DNA ladder (right). Lane 1, isolate from patient 11; Lane 2, patient 13; Lanes 3–6, patients 4, 1, 3, and 2; Lanes 7–9, patients 10, 9, and 8; Lane 10, patient whose isolate differed by three bands and was not included in the study; and Lane 11, patient 5.

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