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Volume 8, Number 12—December 2002

Research

Antimicrobial Resistance of Escherichia coli O26, O103, O111, O128, and O145 from Animals and Humans

Carl M. Schroeder*, Jianghong Meng*, Shaohua Zhao†, Chitrita DebRoy‡, Jocelyn Torcolini‡, Cuiwei Zhao*, Patrick F. McDermott†, David D. Wagner†, Robert D. Walker†, and David G. White†
Author affiliations: *University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, USA; †U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Laurel, Maryland, USA; ‡The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA

Main Article

Figure 1

Comparison of antimicrobial resistance frequencies for Escherichia coli isolates from different sources. Am, ampicillin; Cx, cefoxitin; C, chloramphenicol; Frx, ceftriaxone; Smx, sulfamethoxazole; Cf, cephalothin; Gm, gentamicin; NA, nalidixic acid; Cip, ciprofloxacin; Fur, ceftiofur; Te, tetracycline; T/S, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole; A/C, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid; Str, streptomycin.

Figure 1. . Comparison of antimicrobial resistance frequencies for Escherichia coli isolates from different sources. Am, ampicillin; Cx, cefoxitin; C, chloramphenicol; Frx, ceftriaxone; Smx, sulfamethoxazole; Cf, cephalothin; Gm, gentamicin; NA, nalidixic acid; Cip, ciprofloxacin; Fur, ceftiofur; Te, tetracycline; T/S, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole; A/C, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid; Str, streptomycin.

Main Article

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