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Volume 8, Number 4—April 2002

Research

A Waterborne Outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Infections and Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: Implications for Rural Water Systems 1

Sonja J. Olsen*Comments to Author , Gayle Miller†, Thomas Breuer*, Malinda Kennedy*, Charles Higgins‡, Jim Walford†, Gary McKee†, Kim Fox#, William Bibb*, and Paul S. Mead*
Author affiliations: *Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; †Wyoming Department of Health, Cheyenne, Wyoming, USA; ‡Wyoming Department of Agriculture, Cheyenne, Wyoming, USA; #United States Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA;

Main Article

Table 2

Univariate analysis of exposures in Alpine resident cohort study, Alpine, Wyoming, June–July 1998a

Selected exposuresa Proportion ill Relative risk
(95% CI)
Exposed Nonexposed
Played in sprinkler 10/29 44/254 2.0 (1.1 - 3.5)
Played with water guns 7/19 47/264 2.1 (1.1 - 3.9)
Serviced by municipal water at home 45/192 9/92 2.4 (1.2 - 4.7)
Drank municipal watera 8/211 3/68 5.2 (1.7 - 16.0)
Drank municipal water June 26-28b 8/181 2/62 8.2 (2.1 - 32.8)
Venison consumption 3/13 51/271 1.2 (0.4 - 3.4)
Elk consumption 10/44 44/239 1.2 (0.7 - 2.3)
Jerky consumption 4/25 49/256 0.8 (0.3 - 2.1)
Hamburger consumption 29/147 21/111 1.0 (0.6- 1.7)
Pink hamburger consumption 0/7 27/130 undefined, p=0.2

aExcept when noted, all exposures refer to the period June 25 through July 1, 1998.
bOnly 8 (4%) of 211 persons who drank municipal water reported boiling it.
CI = confidence intervals.

Main Article

1This information was presented at the 36th Annual Meeting of the Infectious Disease Society of America, Denver, CO, November 1998 (Abstract #782).[REMOVED ADVANCE FIELD]

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