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Volume 8, Number 4—April 2002

Research

Experimental Infection of Horses with West Nile virus

Michel L. Bunning*†‡Comments to Author , Richard A. Bowen§, C. Bruce Cropp†, Kevin G. Sullivan†, Brent S. Davis†, Nicholas Komar†, Marvin S. Godsey†, Dale Baker§, Danielle L. Hettler†, Derek A. Holmes†, Brad J. Biggerstaff†, and Carl J. Mitchell†
Author affiliations: *Centers For Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia; †Centers For Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA; ‡United States Air Force; §Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA

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Table 2

Postinfection levels of West Nile viremia in horses, May–July 2000a

Day Viremia levels (Log-10 Vero cell PFU/mL serum)
Horse
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
1 (a.m.) 1.3 - - - - - - -
1 (p.m.) - 1.0 - - - - - -
2 (a.m.) - 1.3 - - - - - -
2 (p.m.) - 1.0 - 1.0 - - - 1.0
3 (a.m.) 2.1 1.5 1.0 - 1.0 - 2.2 -
3 (p.m.) 2.3 1.3 - - 3.0 - - 1.9
4 (a.m.) 2.4 1.6 2.5 1.5 1.3 - 1.3 2.1
4 (p.m.) 1.9 1.5 1.9 1.0 1.3 - - 2.0
5 (a.m.) 1.6 1.5 2.7 1.0 1.3 - - 2.5
5 (p.m.) - 1.6 2.5 - 1.3 - - 2.7
6 (a.m.) - 1.6 2.1 - - - - 2.3
6 (p.m.) - 1.6 2.1 - - - - 2.0

aHorses 9 to 12 were infected by bites of mosquitoes inoculated 12 days earlier with WN virus strain isolated from a horse; horses 13 to 16 similarly infected with strain isolated from a crow; dash indicates viremia level was too low to be detectable or was absent.

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