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Volume 8, Number 8—August 2002

Research

Use of Automated Ambulatory-Care Encounter Records for Detection of Acute Illness Clusters, Including Potential Bioterrorism Events

Ross Lazarus*†Comments to Author , Ken Kleinman‡§, Inna Dashevsky‡, Courtney Adams‡, Patricia Kludt¶, Alfred DeMaria¶, and Richard Platt*‡§
Author affiliations: *Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; †University of Sydney School of Public Health, Sydney, Australia; ‡Harvard Pilgrim Health Care and Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; §CDC Eastern Massachusetts Prevention Epicenter and HMO Research Network Center for Education and Research in Therapeutics, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; ¶Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA;

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Figure 1

Map of sample small area syndrome counts for Monday, March 4, 2002, showing the five census tracts with the most extreme probability values. Labels show name of town, census tract code (state and county prefixes have been removed), and number of cases for the 24 hours included in the report.

Figure 1. Map of sample small area syndrome counts for Monday, March 4, 2002, showing the five census tracts with the most extreme probability values. Labels show name of town, census tract code (state and county prefixes have been removed), and number of cases for the 24 hours included in the report.

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