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Volume 9, Number 10—October 2003

Dispatch

West Nile Virus Encephalitis and Myocarditis in Wolf and Dog

Carol A. Lichtensteiger*Comments to Author , Kathleen Heinz-Taheny*, Tanasa S. Osborne*, Robert J. Novak*, Beth A. Lewis*, and Margaret L. Firth†
Author affiliations: *University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana, Illinois, USA; †Town and Country Animal Hospital, Normal, Illinois, USA

Main Article

Figure 2

Real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction of RNA extracted from the wolf brain. The amplification was duplexed with primers and probes for West Nile and St. Louis encephalitis viruses detected with fluorochrome dyes, FAM and VIC, respectively. Test and control samples were run in parallel and in duplicate (extraction and amplification) with consistent results. Delta reaction on the y axis represents the change in threshold fluorescence. The box lists the source of the template nu

Figure 2. Real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction of RNA extracted from the wolf brain. The amplification was duplexed with primers and probes for West Nile and St. Louis encephalitis viruses detected with fluorochrome dyes, FAM and VIC, respectively. Test and control samples were run in parallel and in duplicate (extraction and amplification) with consistent results. Delta reaction on the y axis represents the change in threshold fluorescence. The box lists the source of the template nucleic acid and the specificity of the fluorochrome probe (template source-probe specificity). WNV, West Nile virus; NY99, an isolate from the 1999 outbreak in New York; SLEV, St. Louis encephalitis virus; NTC, no template control.

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