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Volume 9, Number 10—October 2003

Research

Superantigens and Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome

Thomas Proft*, Shiranee Sriskandan†, Lily Yang*, and John D. Fraser*Comments to Author 
Author affiliations: *University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; †Imperial College, London, United Kingdom

Main Article

Figure 4

Seroconversion of patient 96/2 against streptococcal superantigens (SAgs). Peripheral blood lymphocytes were stimulated with various recombinant streptococcal SAgs in the presence of serum 96/2–4, 96/2–10, or fetal calf serum only. The columns show the percentage of inhibition of recombinant SAgs by neutralizing antibodies in patient serum samples. The sequential serum on day 3 showed a complete lack of neutralizing antistreptococcal mitogenic exotoxin (SME) Z antibodies, while serum 96/2–10 con

Figure 4. Seroconversion of patient 96/2 against streptococcal superantigens (SAgs). Peripheral blood lymphocytes were stimulated with various recombinant streptococcal SAgs in the presence of serum 96/2–4, 96/2–10, or fetal calf serum only. The columns show the percentage of inhibition of recombinant SAgs by neutralizing antibodies in patient serum samples. The sequential serum on day 3 showed a complete lack of neutralizing antistreptococcal mitogenic exotoxin (SME) Z antibodies, while serum 96/2–10 converted to a high anti-SMEZ antibody titer. Both sera enhanced the mitogenic activity of recombinant streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin J, which suggests the presence of an unknown synergistic factor. SPE, antistreptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin; SSA, streptococcal superantigen.

Main Article

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