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Volume 9, Number 10—October 2003

Research

Mass Antibiotic Treatment for Group A Streptococcus Outbreaks in Two Long-Term Care Facilities1

Andrea Smith*†, Aimin Li‡, Ornella Tolomeo*, Gregory J. Tyrell§†, Frances Jamieson‡, and David Fisman*¶Comments to Author 
Author affiliations: *City of Hamilton Social and Public Health Services Department, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; †University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta; ‡Canada Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; §Provincial Laboratory for Public Health, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; ¶McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

Main Article

Figure 2

Epidemic curve for outbreak 1. Clinical cases (black bars) of invasive GAS infection occurred at intervals of 3 to 4 months. With the occurrence of cases, acquisition of culture specimens resulted in identification of asymptomatic colonization with the outbreak strain (white bars) or unrelated strains (hatched bars) in other residents and staff. No additional clinical cases occurred after mass antibiotic treatment (M.A.T.); resident A died (†) in July 2002; colonization of two residents with the

Figure 2. Epidemic curve for outbreak 1. Clinical cases (black bars) of invasive GAS infection occurred at intervals of 3 to 4 months. With the occurrence of cases, acquisition of culture specimens resulted in identification of asymptomatic colonization with the outbreak strain (white bars) or unrelated strains (hatched bars) in other residents and staff. No additional clinical cases occurred after mass antibiotic treatment (M.A.T.); resident A died (†) in July 2002; colonization of two residents with the outbreak strain was recognized 1 month later.

Main Article

1Presented in part at the 12th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), April 6–9, 2002, Salt Lake City, Utah.

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