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Volume 9, Number 12—December 2003

Research

Global Distribution of Rubella Virus Genotypes

Du-Ping Zheng*1, Teryl K. Frey*Comments to Author , Joseph Icenogle†, Shigetaka Katow†‡, Emily S. Abernathy*†, Ki-Joon Song§, Wen-Bo Xu¶, Vitaly Yarulin#, R.G. Desjatskova#, Yair Aboudy**, Gisela Enders††, and Margaret Croxson‡‡
Author affiliations: *Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; †Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA; ‡National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan; §Korea University, Seoul, Korea; ¶Chinese Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, China; #Institute of Viral Preparations, Moscow, Russia; **Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, Israel; ††Institute for Virology, Infectiology and Epidemiology, Stuttgart, Germany; ‡‡Auckland Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand

Main Article

Table 2

Intra- and intergoup genetic distances among rubella genotype I (RGI) and RGII clustersa

Genotype/cluster Intragroup variability Mean distance from
RGII RGIIA RGIIB RGIIC
RGI
0.08–5.75
7.28
7.59
6.20
8.21
RGII
0–7.95




RGIIA
0–5.41


7.24
7.13
RGIIB
0.42–1.95



7.19
RGIIC 2.54

aRanges and mean genetic distances (% nucleotide difference) was determined from all pairwise combinations from viruses in these groups (Figure 1).

Main Article

1Current address: Respiratory and Enteric Viruses Branch, Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.

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