Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

Volume 9, Number 2—February 2003

Research

Emerging Pattern of Rabies Deaths and Increased Viral Infectivity

Sharon L. Messenger*Comments to Author , Jean S. Smith*, Lillian A. Orciari*, Pamela A. Yager*, and Charles E. Rupprecht*
Author affiliations: *Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Main Article

Figure 1

Phylogenetic tree of bat-associated rabies cases. Taxa represent 208 rabies virus variants from 27 human rabies cases (formalin-fixed taxa removed) and 98 terrestrial mammals infected with a bat rabies virus, 60 bat samples representing 17 species, and 23 terrestrial mammal outgroup taxa. Each circle represents a case (terrestrial mammal = closed circles, human = open circles) associated with the monophyletic clade in the phylogeny to the left. Numbers at tree nodes indicate nonparametric bootst

Figure 1. Phylogenetic tree of bat-associated rabies cases. Taxa represent 208 rabies virus variants from 27 human rabies cases (formalin-fixed taxa removed) and 98 terrestrial mammals infected with a bat rabies virus, 60 bat samples representing 17 species, and 23 terrestrial mammal outgroup taxa. Each circle represents a case (terrestrial mammal = closed circles, human = open circles) associated with the monophyletic clade in the phylogeny to the left. Numbers at tree nodes indicate nonparametric bootstrap proportions.

Main Article

TOP