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Volume 9, Number 2—February 2003

Research

Viral Encephalitis in England, 1989–1998: What Did We Miss?

Katy L. Davison*Comments to Author , Natasha S. Crowcroft*, Mary E. Ramsay*, David W.G. Brown†, and Nick J Andrews*
Author affiliations: *Public Health Laboratory Service Communicable Disease Surveillance Centre, London, United Kingdom; †Public Health Laboratory Service Virus Reference Division, London, United Kingdom

Main Article

Table 2

Hospitalizations of viral encephalitis by diagnosis and fiscal year of admission, April 1, 1989–March 31, 1998, England

Diagnosis Date of admission by fiscal yr
1989–90 1990–91 1991–92 1992–93 1993–94 1994–95 1995–96 1996–97 1997–98 Total
Exotic
3
3
7
7
5
9
20
7
3
64
Herpes viruses
Herpes simplexa
138
163
170
175
172
168
120
147
166
1,419
Varicella zoster
8
17
13
8
8
6
94
99
80
333
Others
Measles
16
8
8
7
8
23
7
5
4
86
Mumps
12
5
2
3
1
0
2
3
2
30
Rubella
5
3
3
1
2
5
5
1
1
26
LCMVb
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
2
3
7
Adenoviruses
19
15
21
14
17
14
12
10
7
129
Otherc
47
75
56
51
62
48
58
46
37
480
Total (%)
248 (40)
289 (40)
282 (37)
266 (37)
275 (33)
273 (36)
318 (47)
320 (48)
303 (47)
2,574 (40)
Unspecified viral infection (%)
379 (60)
422 (60)
488 (63)
461 (63)
551 (67)
480 (64)
365 (53)
351 (52)
343 (53)
3,840 (60)
Total (%) 627 (100) 711 (100) 770 (100) 727 (100) 826 (100) 753 (100) 683 (100) 671 (100) 646 (100) 6,414 (100)

aHerpes simplex virus is undefined after 1995–1996 and recorded thereafter as herpes.

bLCMV, Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus.

cBoth “other” and “unspecified” are included because both groups existed from 1995 to

1996 onward.

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