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Volume 9, Number 2—February 2003

Research

Health and Economic Impact of Surgical Site Infections Diagnosed after Hospital Discharge

Eli N. Perencevich*†Comments to Author , Kenneth E. Sands*†, Sara E. Cosgrove*, Edward Guadagnoli‡, Ellen Meara‡, and Richard Platt§†‡
Author affiliations: *Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; †Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Eastern Massachusetts Prevention Epicenter, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; ‡Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; §Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

Main Article

Table 2

Comparison of questionnaire responders to nonresponders, surgical site infection (SSI) studya

Characteristic Responder
N (% or SDa) Nonresponder
N (% or SDa) p value
Study cohort N=267
173
94

Demographics



Age (yr)
58.2 (+/- 12.7)
54.6 (+/-15.2)
0.05b
Male gender
94 (54.3)
43 (45.7)
0.20c
Surgery duration (min)
152 (+/-91)
139 (+/- 98)
0.14d
Surgery type



Cardiac
55 (31.8)
24 (25.5)
0.33c
General
53 (30.6)
25 (26.6)
0.57c
Gynecology
4 (2.3)
2 (2.1)
1.0c
Neurology
7 (4.1)
5 (5.3)
0.76c
Orthopedic
30 (17.3)
17 (18.1)
0.89c
Other
1 (0.6)
4 (4.3)
0.054c
Plastic
5 (2.9)
6 (6.4)
0.20c
Urology
5 (2.9)
4 (4.3)
0.72c
Vascular 13 (7.5) 7 (7.5) 1.0c

aResults are shown as no. (%) or mean +/- SD, along with p value for comparison of cases with SSI to controls without SSI.

bStudent t test.

cFisher exact test.

dWilcoxon rank-sum test.

Main Article

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