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Volume 9, Number 3—March 2003

Synopsis

Electron Microscopy for Rapid Diagnosis of Emerging Infectious Agents1

Paul R. Hazelton*Comments to Author  and Hans R. Gelderblom†
Author affiliations: *University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada; †Robert Koch-Institut, Berlin, Germany

Main Article

Figure 2

Association of human parvovirus B-19 with erythema infectiosum by immuno electron microscopic. A. Airfuge EM-90 rotor (Beckman, Palo Alto, CA) preparation of human serum prospectively collected at time of contact with case of erythema infectiosum. Erythema infectiosum-like rash developed 1 week after collection of serum. B. Immuno electron microscopic preparation of the serum in panel A. The serum was mixed with matched convalescent-phase serum (final dilution convalescent-phase serum 1:100), in

Figure 2. Association of human parvovirus B-19 with erythema infectiosum by immuno electron microscopicAAirfuge EM-90 rotor (Beckman, Palo Alto, CA) preparation of human serum prospectively collected at time of contact with case of erythema infectiosumErythema infectiosum-like rash developed 1 week after collection of serumBImmuno electron microscopic preparation of the serum in panel AThe serum was mixed with matched convalescent-phase serum (final dilution convalescent-phase serum 1:100), incubated for 90 min at 37°C, and virions/immune complexes centrifuged directly to a specimen grid with the EM-90 rotorArrow, complete virion, arrowhead, genome defective virionphosphotungstic acidBar = 100 nmFor study details, see Plummer et al., 1985 (16).

Main Article

1Both authors contributed equally to this review.

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