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Volume 9, Number 4—April 2003

Research

Hepatitis E Virus Epidemiology in Industrialized Countries

Pilar Clemente-Casares*, Sonia Pina*, Maria Buti†, Rosend Jardi†, Margarita Martín‡, Sílvia Bofill-Mas*, and Rosina Girones*Comments to Author 
Author affiliations: *University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; †Hospital General Universitario Valle Hebron, Barcelona, Spain; ‡Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain

Main Article

Figure 1

Unrooted phylogenetic tree showing the relationship over a 123-bp fragment within open reading frame 2 between representative Hepatitis E virus strains reported in this study and other isolates from genotype I (C1, China; P, Pakistan; I, India; BCN, Barcelona, Spain; and B, Burma), genotype II (M, Mexico), genotype III (US1 and US2, United States; Sw, swine; G1 and G2, Greece; It, Italy; and Au, Austria), and genotype IV (C2 and C3, China). Strains from Barcelona, Spain, Washington, D.C., United

Figure 1. Unrooted phylogenetic tree showing the relationship over a 123-bp fragment within open reading frame 2 between representative Hepatitis E virus strains reported in this study and other isolates from genotype I (C1, China; P, Pakistan; I, India; BCN, Barcelona, Spain; and B, Burma), genotype II (M, Mexico), genotype III (US1 and US2, United States; Sw, swine; G1 and G2, Greece; It, Italy; and Au, Austria), and genotype IV (C2 and C3, China). Strains from Barcelona, Spain, Washington, D.C., United States, and Nancy, France, are in black.

Main Article

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