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Volume 18, Number 6—June 2012

Volume 18, Number 6—June 2012   PDF Version [PDF - 4.51 MB - 147 pages]

Synopses

  • Medscape CME Activity
    Iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, Final Assessment PDF Version [PDF - 291 KB - 7 pages]
    P. Brown et al.
    View Summary

    The book on iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans is almost closed. This form of CJD transmission via medical misadventures was first detected in 1974. Today, only occasional CJD cases with exceptionally long incubation periods still appear. The main sources of the largest outbreaks were tissues from human cadavers with unsuspected CJD that were used for dura mater grafts and growth hormone extracts. A few additional cases resulted from neurosurgical instrument contamination, corneal grafts, gonadotrophic hormone, and secondary infections from blood transfusions. Although the final solution to the problem of iatrogenic CJD is still not available (a laboratory test to identify potential donors who harbor the infectious agent), certain other measures have worked well: applying special sterilization of penetrating surgical instruments, reducing the infectious potential of donor blood and tissue, and excluding donors known to have higher than normal risk for CJD.

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