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Volume 23, Number 1—January 2017

CME ACTIVITY - Research

Epidemiology of Hospitalizations Associated with Invasive Candidiasis, United States, 2002–20121

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Earning CME Credit

To obtain credit, you should first read the journal article. After reading the article, you should be able to answer the following, related, multiple-choice questions. To complete the questions (with a minimum 75% passing score) and earn continuing medical education (CME) credit, please go to http://www.medscape.org/journal/eid. Credit cannot be obtained for tests completed on paper, although you may use the worksheet below to keep a record of your answers. You must be a registered user on Medscape.org. If you are not registered on Medscape.org, please click on the “Register” link on the right hand side of the website to register. Only one answer is correct for each question. Once you successfully answer all post-test questions you will be able to view and/or print your certificate. For questions regarding the content of this activity, contact the accredited provider, CME@medscape.net. For technical assistance, contact CME@webmd.net. American Medical Association’s Physician’s Recognition Award (AMA PRA) credits are accepted in the US as evidence of participation in CME activities. For further information on this award, please refer to http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/pub/about-ama/awards/ama-physicians-recognition-award.page. The AMA has determined that physicians not licensed in the US who participate in this CME activity are eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Through agreements that the AMA has made with agencies in some countries, AMA PRA credit may be acceptable as evidence of participation in CME activities. If you are not licensed in the US, please complete the questions online, print the certificate and present it to your national medical association for review.

Article Title: Epidemiology of Hospitalizations Associated with Invasive Candidiasis, United States, 2002–2012

CME Questions

1. You are advising a large hospital about anticipated needs regarding cases of invasive candidiasis (IC). According to the analysis of inpatient hospitalization records from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) by Strollo and colleagues, which of the following statements about rates of IC-associated hospitalizations in the United States from 2002–2012 is correct?

A. Average annual age-adjusted rate of IC-associated hospitalizations in the United States from 2002–2012 was 5.3 hospitalizations per 100,000 population

B. Age-adjusted annual rates decreased significantly from 2005–2012 among men but not among women

C. Among all 50 states, there was significant, marked variation in state-specific rates of IC

D. Age-adjusted annual rates decreased significantly from 2005–2012 among adults 50 to 65 years old, but not in other age groups

2. According to the analysis of inpatient hospitalization records from HCUP by Strollo and colleagues, which of the following statements about risk factors for rates of IC-associated hospitalizations in the United States from 2002–2012 is correct?

A. Children were at highest risk for IC-associated hospitalization

B. Adults 65 years or older were at highest risk, with risk peaking among adults older than 80 years

C. Age groups with the highest rates of IC-associated hospitalizations in this study differ from those of previous reports from population-based surveillance for candidemia

D. Blacks had a 4-fold higher incidence of IC-associated hospitalization

3. According to the analysis of inpatient hospitalization records from HCUP by Strollo and colleagues, which of the following statements about healthcare utilization, complications, and costs of IC-associated hospitalizations in the United States from 2002–2012 is correct?

A. Median length of hospital stay was 21 days overall, with a significant increase during the study period

B. An estimated 12% of patients died during hospitalization

C. There were 97% of IC-associated hospitalizations that were coded as disseminated candidiasis, 3% as candidal endocarditis, and 1% as candidal meningitis

D. Median costs varied more by patient sex than by survival status

Activity Evaluation

1. The activity supported the learning objectives.

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2. The material was organized clearly for learning to occur.

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3. The content learned from this activity will impact my practice.

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4. The activity was presented objectively and free of commercial bias.

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