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No. 3 – Mar 2018

March 2018: Tuberculosis and Mycobacteria

Results of histologic testing of samples from a domestic rabbit with Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis infection, Germany

Results of histologic testing of samples from a domestic rabbit with Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis infection, Germany

Tuberculosis and Mycobacteria

On March 24, 1882, German physician Robert Koch announced the discovery of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the organism that causes tuberculosis (TB), a disease that had plagued humanity for centuries, caused more deaths than any other disease in industrialized countries during the 19th and early 20th centuries, and remains a leading cause of death in the world. March 24 is now commemorated as World TB Day in honor of Koch’s discovery, which EID commemorates by making mycobacteria or TB (caused by a type of mycobacteria) the theme for its March issues.

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About the Cover – Peace, Liberty, Mycobacteria, and Tuberculosis Mortality

Vol 24 Issue 3 Cover

Antonio de Francisci (1887-1964). US Silver Peace Dollar, 1935. Silver (90%), copper (10%), 1.5 in/38.1 mm.

In 1935, Gerhard Domagk and Josef Klarer, working with dyes at the Bayer Institute of Pathology and Bacteriology, published the results of several clinical investigations of sulfamidochrysoidine. This antibacterial drug was the first of the sulfonamide-containing or related products that transformed approaches to treatment of infection and heralded the antibiotic era. Before that, the only antimicrobials available were the arsenicals (arsphenamine and neosalvarsan), which were used to treat syphilis.

You can read the entire About the Cover essay here.

Veterinarian Gets Flu Virus from Cats

Dr. Todd Davis, a CDC research biologist, discusses transmission of avian H7N2 from a cat to a human.

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Etymologia: Rifampin

Chemical structure of Rifampin. Data deposited in or computed by PubChem.

Chemical structure of Rifampin. Data deposited in or computed by PubChem.

Rifampin

In 1957, Piero Sensi and colleagues isolated a new bacterium, Streptomyces mediterranei (now Amycolatopsis rifamycinica), from a soil sample from a pine forest in France. Material extracted from fermentation broths of A. rifamycinica contained microbiologically active substances that, as a group, were nicknamed Rififi. Rififi (French slang for “trouble”) was a 1955 French gangster film that was popular at the time and became the root of the name “rifamycin” for this group of antimicrobial agents. (Similarly, matamycin was originally nicknamed Mata Hari.) Rifampin (also known as rifampicin) is the N-amino-N'-methylpiperazine (AMP) derivative of rifamycin.

You can read the entire Etymologia here.

Past EIDEAS


Tuberculosis—the Face of Struggles, the Struggles We Face, and the Dreams That Lie Within

Tuberculosis—the Face of Struggles, the Struggles We Face, and the Dreams That Lie Within

Tuberculosis—the Face of Struggles, the Struggles We Face, and the Dreams That Lie Within

Tuberculosis disease, or phthisis (Φθισϊϲ, the Greek word for consumption), was named by the father of allopathic medicine, Hippocrates (c. 460–370 BCE), because the disease appeared to consume the affected person through substantial weight loss and wasting (1). Hippocrates warned his students against treating persons in late stages of tuberculosis, because nearly all of their patients would die, which would likely tarnish their reputations as healers.

You can read the entire Another Dimension here.

Article Map

Map of article distribution in 2017

Distribution of journal articles, Volume 23 (2017)

See where articles in the journal come from by using the Articles By Country Search.

Journal Issues

Original Publication Date: 04/05/2018
Permalink: EIDEAS No. 3 - Mycobacteria (Mar 2018)
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