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Volume 10, Number 3—March 2004

Research

Correlating Epidemiologic Trends with the Genotypes Causing Meningococcal Disease, Maryland

M. Catherine McEllistrem*Comments to Author , John A. Kolano*, Margaret A. Pass†, Dominique A. Caugant‡, Aaron B. Mendelsohn§, Antonio Guilherme Fonseca Pacheco§, Jafar Razeq¶, Lee H. Harrison*†, and the Maryland Emerging Infections Program
Author affiliations: *University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health and School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA; †Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA; ‡World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Meningococci, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway; §University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA; ¶Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

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Figure 3

Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns of meningococcal serogroup Y strains isolated from persons >25 years during 1992–1999. Culture date and sequence type are listed to the right of the dendrogram.

Figure 3. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns of meningococcal serogroup Y strains isolated from persons >25 years during 1992–1999. Culture date and sequence type are listed to the right of the dendrogram.

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