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Volume 10, Number 4—April 2004

Research

Antimicrobial Resistance Gene Delivery in Animal Feeds

Karen Lu*, Rumi Asano†, and Julian Davies*Comments to Author 
Author affiliations: *University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C., Canada; †University of California, Berkeley, California, USA

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Figure 3

A, Molecular mass of total DNA extracted from animal feed grade avoparcin. M: 1 kb plus DNA ladder (Invitrogen, Burlington, Ontario, Canada). Lane 1: sample of total DNA extracted from animal feed–grade avoparcin. B, Polymerase chain reaction amplification of partial 16S rDNA (1051 bp) with primers 16S 440F and 16S 1491R. M:1 kb plus DNA ladder. Lane 1: DNA extracted from animal feed grade avoparcin. Lane 2: DNA of the avoparcin producer Amycolatopsis coloradensis NRRL 3218.

Figure 3. A, Molecular mass of total DNA extracted from animal feed grade avoparcin. M: 1 kb plus DNA ladder (Invitrogen, Burlington, Ontario, Canada). Lane 1: sample of total DNA extracted from animal feed–grade avoparcin. B, Polymerase chain reaction amplification of partial 16S rDNA (1051 bp) with primers 16S 440F and 16S 1491R. M:1 kb plus DNA ladder. Lane 1: DNA extracted from animal feed grade avoparcin. Lane 2: DNA of the avoparcin producer Amycolatopsis coloradensis NRRL 3218.

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