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Volume 10, Number 7—July 2004

Research

Nosocomial Infection with Vancomycin-dependent Enterococci1

Paul A. Tambyah*Comments to Author , John A. Marx*, and Dennis G. Maki*
Author affiliations: *University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, Wisconsin, USA

Main Article

Figure 2

Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of the three strains of vancomycin-dependent enterococci (VDE) and, in two cases, a vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) strain isolated before the VDE in the same patient. The three VDE strains appear to be genetically distinct, although two may be related. In both cases in which VRE was isolated before VDE, VRE and subsequent VDE strains appear genetically identical. RFLP, restriction fragement length polymorphism; MW, molecular weight; λ, lambda ladder, Y, y

Figure 2. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of the three strains of vancomycin-dependent enterococci (VDE) and, in two cases, a vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) strain isolated before the VDE in the same patient. The three VDE strains appear to be genetically distinct, although two may be related. In both cases in which VRE was isolated before VDE, VRE and subsequent VDE strains appear genetically identical. RFLP, restriction fragement length polymorphism; MW, molecular weight; λ, lambda ladder, Y, yeast chromosome marker.

Main Article

1Presented in part at the 38th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, San Diego, CA, September 24–27, 1998.

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