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Volume 10, Number 9—September 2004

Dispatch

Yellow Fever Outbreak, Southern Sudan, 2003

Clayton O. Onyango*, Antoinette A. Grobbelaar†, Georgina V.F. Gibson†, Rosemary C. Sang*, Abdourahmane Sow‡, Robert Swanepoel†, and Felicity J. Burt†
Author affiliations: *World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Arbovirus and Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Reference and Research at Kenya Medical Research Institute, Nairobi, Kenya; †National Institute for Communicable Diseases, Sandringham, Johannesburg, South Africa; ‡World Health Organization of Southern Sudan, Nairobi, Kenya

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Figure

Phylogenetic tree showing the relationship between yellow fever virus circulating during the outbreak in southern Sudan in 2003 and other isolates from previous outbreaks in Africa, determined by using a 572-bp region of the genome, a weighted parsimony method and Phylogenetic Analysis Using Parsimony (PAUP) software. Node values indicate bootstrap confidence values generated from 100 replicates (heuristic search).

Figure. Phylogenetic tree showing the relationship between yellow fever virus circulating during the outbreak in southern Sudan in 2003 and other isolates from previous outbreaks in Africa, determined by using a 572-bp region of the genome, a weighted parsimony method and Phylogenetic Analysis Using Parsimony (PAUP) software. Node values indicate bootstrap confidence values generated from 100 replicates (heuristic search).

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