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Volume 11, Number 2—February 2005

Letter

Mycotic Brain Abscess Caused by Opportunistic Reptile Pathogen

Christoph Steininger*Comments to Author , Jan van Lunzen*, Kathrin Tintelnot†, Ingo Sobottka*, Holger Rohde*, Matthias Ansver Horstkotte*, and Hans-Jürgen Stellbrink*
Author affiliations: *University Clinic Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany; †Robert Koch-Institut, Mykologie, Berlin, Germany

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Figure

Chrysosporium sp. brain abscess in an HIV-seropositive patient. A) T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of the brain showing 2 large masses (triangle) surrounded by a ring of signal intensity and extensive perifocal edema (open arrows), global swelling of the right hemisphere, and a midline shift of 1.2 cm. B) Computed tomographic scan of the chest showing infiltration of the left and right lower segment. C) Mold mycelium in aspirate of brain abscess using calcoflour white stain. D)

FigureChrysosporium sp. brain abscess in an HIV-seropositive patient. A) T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of the brain showing 2 large masses (triangle) surrounded by a ring of signal intensity and extensive perifocal edema (open arrows), global swelling of the right hemisphere, and a midline shift of 1.2 cm. B) Computed tomographic scan of the chest showing infiltration of the left and right lower segment. C) Mold mycelium in aspirate of brain abscess using calcoflour white stain. D) T2-weighted MRI scan of the brain performed 4 months after beginning of therapy.

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