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Volume 11, Number 8—August 2005

Research

Cephalosporin-resistant Pneumococci and Sickle Cell Disease

Martha L. Miller*1, Caroline A. Obert*1, Geli Gao*, Najat C. Daw*, Patricia Flynn*, and Elaine Tuomanen*Comments to Author 
Author affiliations: *St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, USA

Main Article

Figure

Bayesian analysis of the phylogenetic relationship among pneumococcal isolates from sickle-cell disease patients as determined by multilocus sequence type (MLST). ST, sequence type, as defined by the MLST database. Strains in boldface had recognized allele numbers but not recognized profiles according to the current database (listed as NT). Putative novel sequence types (those with unrecognized alleles) are in boldface and italics. Dots indicate resistance to penicillin. Boxes indicate sequence

Figure. . Bayesian analysis of the phylogenetic relationship among pneumococcal isolates from sickle-cell disease patients as determined by multilocus sequence type (MLST). ST, sequence type, as defined by the MLST database. Strains in boldface had recognized allele numbers but not recognized profiles according to the current database (listed as NT). Putative novel sequence types (those with unrecognized alleles) are in boldface and italics. Dots indicate resistance to penicillin. Boxes indicate sequence types determined to be resistant to cephalosporins. Red box, intermediate resistance, previously described; black box, highly resistant, previously described; yellow box, intermediate resistance, not previously described; white box, highly resistant, not previously described. Clade credibility scores >80% are listed on the tree.

Main Article

1These authors contributed equally to this study.

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