Skip directly to local search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options
CDC Home

Volume 13, Number 11—November 2007

Research

Role of Terrestrial Wild Birds in Ecology of Influenza A Virus (H5N1)

Adrianus C.M. Boon*1, Matthew R. Sandbulte*1, Patrick Seiler*, Richard J. Webby*, Thaweesak Songserm†, Yi Guan‡, and Robert G. Webster*Comments to Author 
Author affiliations: *St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, USA; †Medicine Kasetsart University, Nakorn Pathom, Thailand; ‡University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, People’s Republic of China;

Main Article

Figure

Average peak influenza A virus titers in oropharyngeal (A) and cloacal (B) swabs during the course of influenza (H5N1) infection in 3 terrestrial bird species. C, influenza A virus titers in lungs and brains of deceased sparrows. Data are presented as log10 50% egg infectious doses per milliliter (log10 EID50/mL). ND, no data available.

Figure. Average peak influenza A virus titers in oropharyngeal (A) and cloacal (B) swabs during the course of influenza (H5N1) infection in 3 terrestrial bird species. C, influenza A virus titers in lungs and brains of deceased sparrows. Data are presented as log10 50% egg infectious doses per milliliter (log10 EID50/mL). ND, no data available.

Main Article

1These authors contributed equally to the study.

Top of Page

 

Past Issues

Select a Past Issue:

Art in Science - Selections from Emerging Infectious Diseases
Now available for order



CDC 24/7 – Saving Lives, Protecting People, Saving Money. Learn More About How CDC Works For You…

USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention   1600 Clifton Rd. Atlanta, GA 30333, USA
800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) TTY: (888) 232-6348 - Contact CDC–INFO