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Volume 13, Number 2—February 2007

Research

Community-associated Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolates and Healthcare-Associated Infections1

Cynthia L. Maree*, Robert S. Daum†, Susan Boyle-Vavra†, Kelli Matayoshi‡2, and Loren G. Miller*‡Comments to Author 
Author affiliations: *David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, California, USA; †University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA; ‡Los Angeles Biomedical Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, California, USA;

Main Article

Table 2

Summary of genetic testing for 24 healthcare-associated MRSA blood isolates*†

No. isolatesSCCmecmecImecR1
(PB)pvlMLSTClindamycinGentamicinTMP-SMXSCCmec type phenotype‡
8
IV


+
8
S
S
S
IV
1
IV


+
1
S
S
S
IV
2
IV



8
S
S
S
IV
1*
IV

-

8
R
R
R
II
5
II
+
+

5
R
R
S
II
4
II
+
+

5
R
S
S
II
1
II
+
+

8
R
S
S
II

II
+
+

5
S
S
S
IV
-5RSSII

*MRSA, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus; PB, penicillin-binding region;;MLST, multilocus sequence typing; R, resistant; S,
susceptible; TMP-SMX, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole.
†All isolates were associated with mecA and ccr2 genes.
‡Phenotype: as defined by the study case definition, according to antimicrobial drug susceptibilities (see Methods).
§SCCmec phenotype did not match genotype.
¶SCCmec was not located for this isolate.

Main Article

1Findings from this investigation were presented in part at the 45th Annual International Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, Washington, DC, USA, December 2005.

2Current affiliation: University of Southern California School of Pharmacy, Los Angeles, California

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