Skip directly to local search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options
CDC Home

Volume 13, Number 3—March 2007

Perspective

Bird Migration Routes and Risk for Pathogen Dispersion into Western Mediterranean Wetlands

Elsa Jourdain*†Comments to Author , Michel Gauthier-Clerc*, Dominique Bicout†, and Philippe Sabatier†
Author affiliations: *Station Biologique de la Tour du Valat, Arles, France; †Ecole Nationale Vétérinaire de Lyon – Institut National de Recherche Agronomique, Marcy l'Etoile, France

Main Article

Figure 5

Cumulative number of the most abundant waterfowl species recorded in the Camargue during winter 2004–05: mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), northern shoveler (A. clypeata), green-winged teal (A. crecca), Eurasian wigeon (A. penelope), gadwall (A. strepera), red-crested pochard (Netta rufina), common pochard (Aythya ferina), tufted duck (Aythya fuligula), and common coot (Fulica atra). This figure shows that numerous birds and bird species are congregated in the same wetlands during winter and can the

Figure 5. Cumulative number of the most abundant waterfowl species recorded in the Camargue during winter 2004–05: mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), northern shoveler (A. clypeata), green-winged teal (A. crecca), Eurasian wigeon (A. penelope), gadwall (A. strepera), red-crested pochard (Netta rufina), common pochard (Aythya ferina), tufted duck (Aythya fuligula), and common coot (Fulica atra). This figure shows that numerous birds and bird species are congregated in the same wetlands during winter and can therefore easily transmit pathogens to each other.

Main Article

Top of Page

 

Past Issues

Select a Past Issue:

Art in Science - Selections from Emerging Infectious Diseases
Now available for order



CDC 24/7 – Saving Lives, Protecting People, Saving Money. Learn More About How CDC Works For You…

USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention   1600 Clifton Rd. Atlanta, GA 30333, USA
800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) TTY: (888) 232-6348 - Contact CDC–INFO