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Volume 13, Number 3—March 2007

Letter

Novel Hantavirus Sequences in Shrew, Guinea

Boris Klempa*†, Elisabeth Fichet-Calvet‡, Emilie Lecompte§, Brita Auste*, Vladimir Aniskin¶, Helga Meisel*, Patrick Barrière#, Lamine Koivogui**, Jan ter Meulen§1, and Detlev H. Kruger*Comments to Author 
Author affiliations: *University Hospital Charité, Berlin, Germany; †Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava, Slovak Republic; ‡Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle, Paris, France; §Philipps University, Marburg, Germany; ¶Severtsov Institute of Ecology and Evolution, Moscow, Russia; #Université de Rennes 1, Paimpont, France; **Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Project, Conakry, Guinea;

Main Article

Figure

Maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis of hantaviruses showing the phylogenetic placement of Tan826 (Tanganya virus, indicated by arrow) based on partial L segment nucleotide (A) and amino acid (B) sequences and partial S segment amino acid sequences (C); GenBank accession nos. EF050454 and EF050455, respectively. The values near the branches represent PUZZLE support values (4) calculated from 10,000 puzzling steps; only values ≥70% are shown. The scale bar indicates an evolutionary distance o

Figure. Maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis of hantaviruses showing the phylogenetic placement of Tan826 (Tanganya virus, indicated by arrow) based on partial L segment nucleotide (A) and amino acid (B) sequences and partial S segment amino acid sequences (C); GenBank accession nos. EF050454 and EF050455, respectively. The values near the branches represent PUZZLE support values (4) calculated from 10,000 puzzling steps; only values ≥70% are shown. The scale bar indicates an evolutionary distance of 0.1 substitutions per position in the sequence. Gray ellipsoids indicate the 3 major hantavirus groups (panels A and C) or different genera of the Bunyaviridae family (panel B). We used 412 nt (137 aa) of the L segment (nucleotide position 2956–3367, amino acid position 974–1110) and 147 aa (nucleotide position 685–1111, amino acid position 217–364) of the putative nucleoprotein. Fragment positions were defined according to complete sequences of Hantaan virus strain 76-118 (GenBank accession nos. NC_005222 and NC_005218, respectively). The L segment fragment was amplified as described previously (4); for the S segment fragment, highly degenerated primers Cro2F (5′-AGYCCIGTIATGRGWGTIRTYGG-3′) and Cro2R (5′-AIGAYTGRTARAAIGAIGAYTTYTT-3′) were used. TREE-PUZZLE (www.tree-puzzle.de; [4]) was used to calculate the trees with HKY (panel A) and JTT (panels B and C) evolutionary models. Missing parameters were reconstructed from the data set. The following sequences were obtained from GenBank: X55901, AJ410617, X56492, DQ268652, M63194, AJ005637, L37901, AF291704, X14383, U12396, AF484424, AF133128, D10066, X56464, D10759, U15018 for L segment and M14626, L41916, S47716, DQ268650, M32750, Z69991, L25784, AF291702, AY526097 for S segment analysis.

Main Article

1Current affiliation: Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands

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